16 months later Working with my roommates and parents, young (and not so young) people had enough. A spokesman for the real estate leasing site StreetEasy said people who can afford it are increasingly moving to their first place when the lease ends this summer and fall. Searches for studio apartments increased 69% year-on-year.

But when it comes to decorating these single nests, designers say the green of the first timer leads to an error: living like a curtain or rug from stuffing an orfish sofa through the door. I couldn’t even measure the sans citizens. As New York City designer Philip Thomas said, “Just because it’s your first apartment doesn’t mean it can’t have a sense of sophistication.”

Here, design professionals emphasize the five most frequently visited flabs by novice renters, as millennials call them “adults.” Plus: A chic choice.

1. Unconquered division

For generations, crushed people have inherited different ways to divide a studio apartment into a living space and a sleeping space. Curtains, free-standing screens, bookshelves, and even jungle-like vegetation contouring columns. Franceska Butch, founder of BG Studio in Manhattan, says all of this can make the space feel smaller. Thomas said such barriers often block window light, creating muddy caves. “There is nothing worse than living in a space without light,” he said.

Instead: Instead of leaning the bed’s headboard against the wall, Butch instructed him to “float” the bed with his feet facing the window, leaving at least two feet of circulation at the bottom. The medium height headboard acts as a divider without stealing natural light from the rest of the studio. Carry the sofa on your back and place the seating area on the other side. In this way, you won’t expose your guests to crumpled pillows or stuffed animals that haven’t yet brutally cut their ties.

To create a livable compartment in a studio apartment that uses headboards, float the bed in the middle of the room and point your feet at the windows.

Photo:
living4media / Mondadori Portfolio

2. Helter-Skelter inheritance

Please note that the jumble of relatives of the furniture is thrown away. Christina Kim, a designer in Manasquan, NJ, warned that “these furniture are usually out of scale and too many styles can feel chaotic.”

Instead: “Don’t feel obliged to accept every piece that comes your way,” said Thomas. If the donation doesn’t suit your decoration, decline it politely or change the offering to suit your style. For his first rental in Washington, DC, Thomas draped the quilt, threw cut velvet pillows, and matched a random sofa to his aesthetic.

3. Placeholder art

New York City designer Young Fu complained that renters often settled on several posters hung on sticky strips, worried about the confiscation of security deposits. According to Manhattan designer Starlet Ringbomb, even with more ambitious prints and paintings, beginners tend to hang them too high and attach them to cheap plastic frames.

Instead: Invest in some issues. “Patching and painting at the end of the lease is a small price to pay for a charming and collected house, even for a year,” Huh said. Ringdam advised that the art be hung at eye level for a comfortable look. Ringdam also argues that professionally assembling art is a worthwhile investment. “The silver leaf frame instantly enhances the poster of your last visit to the museum into the art of a living room wall,” she said.

4. Single source identity

Lauren Wall, co-founder of Principle Faucets in Santa Cruz, California, said: Does it really represent your multifaceted personality?

Instead: “Spend your time looking for killer, high-quality resale products to combine with new budget-friendly products,” Wall suggested. Your space has “more intent and personality” than if you bought it all at once. Thomas recommended searching for real estate sales and online auctions. And it’s not just about sticking to what a particular piece looks like in the context of catalog photography. Catalina Echavarria, co-founder of Miami furniture and interior design firm CEU Studio, suggested shopping directly if possible and thinking about what you think. Use the item. “When I sit on the couch, I want to be hugged and grow up … When I step on the rug, I want to love it with my bare feet and feel the texture,” she said.

5. Throw bad light

I think you have all the landlord’s flash mount ceiling lights (also known as “boo brights”, which are named because they often take the form of milky glass hemispheres with nipple-like finials). If so, think again. “Overhead lighting is ugly and ineffective for tasks such as reading,” said Annie Elliott, a designer in Washington, DC, who said that these appliances had a white wall with an eerie, bluish hospital-like glow. He pointed out that he often uses light bulbs to drop.

Instead: Elliott buys a hilarious table lamp to add color, style, and of course light. “It raises the entire room.” Warm yellowish light bulbs help create a homely atmosphere. Replace and store the bulbs on the landlord’s ceiling so that they can be replaced when you move.

ODD SQUAD

Pros remember strange first-time decorative movements


figure:


Dawid Ryski

“Beach chair As a lounge chair. Please put outdoor furniture outside! — — Mark Baher, Founder, Stuga, Austin, Texas

“Beer can Stack to create a base and a piece of glass on it. It’s a creative way to recycle, but it doesn’t look good when you’re trying to look like an adult. I also saw the bed sheets nailed to the window sill as curtains. — — Amanda Thompson Designer, New York city

“shelf Of a glass bottle filled with water infused with a highlighter to display in black light. In fact, say no to blacklight in the first place. — — Lauren Wall, co-founder of Principle Faucets in Santa Cruz, California.

“Contractor Place a plastic cage over the bookshelf and work lightly. — — Annie Elliott, Interior Designer, Washington DC

“Furniture made of concrete blocks. It was ominous.” — Christina Kim, Interior Designer, Manasquan, NJ

Write to Rachel Wolf ([email protected])

Design and decoration details

Copyright © 2021 DowJones & Company, Inc. all rights reserved. 87990cbe856818d5eddac44c7b1cdeb8

By admin