why co-housing is growing in Canada

Peterborough County, Ont.—Kris Robinson Staveley grew up on this farm but she doesn’t want to grow old here. 

Her father, a therapist from California, bought the acreage overlooking Lower Buckhorn Lake in Peterborough County to open what he called a human growth potential centre. He wanted to help people work on their relationships. The country retreat, with more than 40 hectares of meandering trails through relatively isolated woods and meadows, seemed an idyllic setting to do that. And for two years in the 1970s, he ran the site as a commune, complete with a geodesic dome, when Robinson Staveley was just a kid. 







dog look

Alan Slavin, right, and his wife, Linda, centre, with Marc Staveley near Buckhorn, Ont. They are part of group involved in building community living project in Peterborough. 




From concept to co-housing







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“We’re trying to recreate the concept of a village,” says Aukje Byker, a member of the Kawartha Commons Cohousing group.










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Little Mountain Cohousing community lives in a six-storey, multigeneration building in Vancouver. 










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In most cases, co-housing owners are financing, planning and designing the space themselves. The concept is part of a growing trend across Canada with new groups forming in Toronto, Ottawa and Kingston. 










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Alan Slavin and his wife, Linda, near Buckhorn, Ont. They are part of group involved in building community living project in Peterborough. 




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